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updated: 2/4/2015 1:51 PM

Hazardous waste collection center nearing completion in Naperville

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  • A sign in the Naperville municipal center promotes the opening this spring of the new household hazardous waste facility, which will become a one-stop drop-off location for electronics, light bulbs, prescription medications, household hazardous waste such as oil-based paint and pesticides, and items such as paper, plastic and glass.

    A sign in the Naperville municipal center promotes the opening this spring of the new household hazardous waste facility, which will become a one-stop drop-off location for electronics, light bulbs, prescription medications, household hazardous waste such as oil-based paint and pesticides, and items such as paper, plastic and glass.
    Marie Wilson | Staff Photographer

 
 

Naperville is nearing completion of a new household hazardous waste facility that will serve as a regional drop-off point for a broad range of recyclable materials.

Electronics, light bulbs, prescription medications, household hazardous waste items such as oil-based paint and pesticide and more typical recyclables such as paper, plastic and glass all will be accepted at the $1.2 million facility being built at 156 Fort Hill Drive, just north of the city's public works headquarters.

Assistant City Manager Marcie Schatz said the new hazardous waste collection center will open this spring, likely in March.

The building will provide more space for hazardous and recyclable materials to be stored before being disposed properly. It also is designed to decrease wait times for people lining up to drop off recyclables at one of only four such facilities in the state.

The 4,935-square-foot building is expected to cost $221,249 a year to operate, Dick Dublinski, public works director, said in a memo. The city recoups some of those costs through agreements with DuPage, Kane and Will counties and the city of Aurora.

The council on Tuesday approved an update to one of those agreements that says Will County will contribute $25,000 this year toward household hazardous waste operations.

Much of the money to build the $1.2 million collection center came from a $900,000 state grant former Gov. Pat Quinn announced in July 2013.